News

GI Issues in Kids With COVID-19 MIS-C May Muddy Diagnosis

— Pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome symptoms could mimic less toxic GI infections, IBD Children and adolescents with COVID-19 who developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) often exhibited marked gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations, sometimes confounding diagnosis by mimicking GI infections or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a recent case series. In a chart review of 44 pediatric patients (ages 7 months to 20 years, ...

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New study sheds light on IBD patients with COVID-19

In an upcoming study to be published in Gastroenterology, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine report on the clinical course of COVID-19 and risk factors for adverse outcomes in a large cohort of patients with IBD collected through an international registry. When the COVID-19 epidemic started to unfold ...

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Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked

A systematic review and meta-analysis at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster in collaboration with the Society for the Study of Celiac Disease has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. Similarly, the risk for celiac disease is increased in IBD patients, though to a ...

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Cancer researchers identify checkpoint target for colorectal cancer immunotherapy

Immunotherapy uses the body’s immune system to target and destroy cancer cells. Considered the future of cancer treatment, immunotherapy is less toxic than chemotherapy. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer among men and women, yet chemotherapy remains the standard of care as limited numbers of patients respond to current immunotherapy treatment options. The findings published in JCI Insight could provide ...

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Electronic health records fail to detect up to 33% of medication errors

Despite improvements in their performance over the past decade, electronic health records (EHRs) commonly used in hospitals nationwide fail to detect up to one in three potentially harmful drug interactions and other medication errors, according to scientists at University of Utah Health, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. In tests using simulated medical records, the researchers found ...

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