News

Researchers improve screening rates for West Virginia’s second-deadliest cancer

In West Virginia, where colorectal cancer is the second-deadliest type of cancer, half of all colorectal cancers elude diagnosis until they have already grown beyond the colon. With Medicaid expansion, more West Virginians now have health insurance for cancer screening, yet many barriers to screening persist. West Virginia University researchers are working to improve screening rates for the state, which ...

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New program advances technologies and treatments of gastrointestinal, metabolic ailments

Cedars-Sinai has launched an initiative to accelerate the development of novel drugs, devices and therapies aimed at improving treatments for patients with gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases. Physician-scientists and others in the Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program are focusing their research expertise on disorders of the microbiome. This naturally occurring ecosystem of single-cell organisms — including bacteria, fungi, viruses ...

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Study to compare the effectiveness of biologic or small molecule therapies in IBD receives funding

Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), collectively referred to as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which may affect as many as 3 million Americans, cost over $6 billion annually, and cause substantial patient morbidity, missed work and school, and diminished quality of life. Currently, anti-TNF therapy is considered first line treatment for moderate-to-severe IBD. However, up to 80 percent of ...

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Penn study reveals secrets of ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ pancreatic cancer tumors

So-called “hot” tumors filled with T cells are often considered to be more sensitive to immunotherapy compared to “cold” tumors with fewer T cells, but a clear demonstration of why has eluded cancer biologists–until now. A team from Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) discovered that whether a tumor is hot or cold is determined by information embedded in the ...

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Timing is key for bacteria surviving antibiotics

For bacteria facing a dose of antibiotics, timing might be the key to evading destruction. In a series of experiments, Princeton researchers found that cells that repaired DNA damaged by antibiotics before resuming growth had a much better chance of surviving treatment. When antibiotics hit a population of bacteria, often a small fraction of “persister” cells survive to pose a ...

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