Study identifies processes in the gut that drive fat build-up around the waist

Research by scientists at King’s College London into the role the gut plays in processing and distributing fat could pave the way for the development of personalized treatments for obesity and other chronic diseases within the next decade. The research is published in Nature Genetics. In the largest study of its kind, scientists analysed the fecal metabolome (the community of ...

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American Cancer Society updates colorectal cancer screening guideline

An updated American Cancer Society guideline says colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 45 for people at average risk, based in part on data showing rates of colorectal cancer are increasing in young and middle-aged populations. The new recommended starting age is based on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates, results from microsimulation modeling that demonstrate a favorable benefit-to-burden balance of screening ...

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Infection rates after colonoscopy, endoscopy at US specialty centers are far higher than expected

The rates of infection following colonoscopies and upper-GI endoscopies performed at U.S. outpatient specialty centers are far higher than previously believed, according to a Johns Hopkins study published online this month in the journal Gut. Johns Hopkins researcher Susan Hutfless, PhD, led a team that plumbed medical data from the year 2014 and determined that patients who underwent one of the common procedures ...

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Scientists find key to growth of ‘bad’ bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease

Scientists have long puzzled over why “bad” bacteria such as E. coli can thrive in the guts of those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), causing serious diarrhea. Now UC Davis researchers have discovered the answer–one that may be the first step toward finding new and better treatments for IBD. The researchers discovered a biological mechanism by which harmful bacteria grow, ...

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Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?

The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and fecal transplants. In new research, Oxford University scientists have developed a lab-based approach, creating positive co-dependent relationships ...

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