News

World MRSA Awareness Month, October

The ongoing MRSA epidemic continues to be a major global threat and MRSA emerged into the world over fifty years ago. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium spread and mutated for decades throughout Europe and other continents, which has had a devastating and fatal effect on patients in healthcare facilities worldwide and now in the community. World MRSA Awareness Month, October ...

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New study finds that inflammatory proteins in the colon increase incrementally with weight

Studies in mice have demonstrated that obesity-induced inflammation contributes to the risk of colorectal cancer, but evidence in humans has been scarce. A new study shows that two inflammatory proteins in the colon increase in parallel with increasing weight in humans. An incremental rise in these pro-inflammatory proteins (called cytokines) was observed along the entire spectrum of subjects’ weights, which ...

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NIH study finds probiotic Bacillus eliminates Staphylococcus bacteria

A new study from National Institutes of Health scientists and their Thai colleagues shows that a “good” bacterium commonly found in probiotic digestive supplements helps eliminate Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that can cause serious antibiotic-resistant infections. The researchers, led by scientists at NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), unexpectedly found that Bacillus bacteria prevented S. ...

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Gut bacteria’s shocking secret: They produce electricity

While bacteria that produce electricity have been found in exotic environments like mines and the bottoms of lakes, scientists have missed a source closer to home: the human gut.   University of California, Berkeley, scientists discovered that a common diarrhea-causing bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes, produces electricity using an entirely different technique from known electrogenic bacteria, and that hundreds of other bacterial ...

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Pilot study identifies strain of bacteria as chief risk factor for stomach cancer

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found a specific strain of Helicobacter pylori strongly correlated with stomach cancer. The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE, could eventually be used to shape treatment and screening strategies for patients. Collaborating with researchers at Zhengzhou University, the Fred Hutch team ran tests on 49 patients’ stomach endoscopy and stool samples, looking for H. pylori with a variant ...

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