News

Metastatic cancer gorges on fructose in the liver

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that metastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs. Specifically, the research shows that cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The finding offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting ...

Read More »

New methods for genetics analyses and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

The two most common types of inflammatory bowel diseases are ulcerous colitis and Crohn’s disease. These are diagnosed by camera inside the gut, and by investigating small samples of the gut (biopsies). The diagnosis is often difficult, and if the wrong diagnosis is made, there may be severe consequences for the patients, because the treatments and medications are different between ...

Read More »

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three humans carries Staphylococcus aureus, or “staph,” in our noses, and 2 percent of us carry the dreaded methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain that thwarts common antibiotics. So how is it that most of us never get sick from staph infections? Researchers at the University of Washington School of ...

Read More »

Vapers and non-smokers have the same flourishing gut flora

 The first study of its kind has found that people who vape have the same mix of gut bacteria as non-smokers, whilst smokers have significant changes to their microbiome. The international team of researchers led by Newcastle University, analysed the bacteria of tobacco smokers, users of e-cigarettes and non-smokers from samples throughout the digestive tract, including in the mouth and ...

Read More »

Study identifies ways smaller hospitals can effectively reduce antibiotic overuse

Researchers at Intermountain Healthcare and University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City have completed a study identifying how community hospitals with fewer than 200 beds can develop antibiotic stewardship programs that work to prevent the growth of antibiotic-resistant organisms, or “superbugs,” which are becoming more common and deadly. For the 15 month-study, researchers compared the impact of three types ...

Read More »