MRSA

A self-cleaning surface that repels even the deadliest superbugs

A team of researchers at McMaster University has developed a self-cleaning surface that can repel all forms of bacteria, preventing the transfer of antibiotic-resistant superbugs and other dangerous bacteria in settings ranging from hospitals to kitchens. The new plastic surface — a treated form of conventional transparent wrap – can be shrink-wrapped onto door handles, railings, IV stands and other ...

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Cigarette smoke makes MRSA superbug bacterium more drug-resistant

Cigarette smoke can make MRSA bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics, new research from the University of Bath has shown. In addition cigarette smoke exposure can make some strains of Staphylococcus aureus, a microbe present in 30 to 60 percent of the global population and responsible for many diseases, some fatal, more invasive and persistent, although the effect is not universal ...

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World MRSA Awareness Month, October

The ongoing MRSA epidemic continues to be a major global threat and MRSA emerged into the world over fifty years ago. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium spread and mutated for decades throughout Europe and other continents, which has had a devastating and fatal effect on patients in healthcare facilities worldwide and now in the community. World MRSA Awareness Month, October ...

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Researchers turn powerful, viscous disinfectants into breathable mist for the first time

A team of engineers and physicians in San Diego have developed a device that diffuses potent disinfectants for airborne delivery. Notably, the device works on a range of disinfectants that have never been atomized before, such as Triethylene glycol, or TEG. In a study published in the August issue of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, the team used the device to ...

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Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three humans carries Staphylococcus aureus, or “staph,” in our noses, and 2 percent of us carry the dreaded methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain that thwarts common antibiotics. So how is it that most of us never get sick from staph infections? Researchers at the University of Washington School of ...

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