Author Archives: Karin Lillis

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation selected for FDA MyStudies app project

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation was selected as one of two patient organizations to participate in an U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Real-World Evidence Program demonstration project using the FDA MyStudies App through the FDA-Catalyst system. The FDA Real World Evidence Program will inform the assessment of the fitness for use of real-world data to support real-world evidence generation for ...

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Crohn’s disease study identifies genetic variant with potential to personalize treatment

The largest study ever to look at why an expensive and commonly–used group of drugs fails some patients with Crohn’s disease has identified a genetic marker which could individualize drug treatment. A UK wide collaboration led by the University of Exeter, Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, has demonstrated that a genetic variant carried by 40% of the ...

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Impacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut

The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, applied three-dimensional microscopy to nearly transparent zebrafish to show how weak levels of antibiotics induce structural changes in gut bacterial communities that cause severe drops in the bacterial populations. “Low levels of antibiotics are often found as environmental contaminants, for example from widespread use in raising livestock,” ...

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A reliable clock for your microbiome

Now, a new tool created by researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) provides a solution to this problem in the form of a set of bacterial genes that have been engineered to detect and record changes in the growth of different populations of bacteria over time in the guts ...

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80% cut in antibiotics entering Thames is needed to avoid surge in superbugs

The amount of antibiotics entering the River Thames would need to be cut by as much as 80% to avoid the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant “superbugs,” a new study has shown. Scientists from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) modeled the effects of antibiotic prescriptions on the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a river. It found that across ...

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